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    Beowulf

    The translation of Beowulf by J.R.R. Tolkien was an early work, completed in 1926: he returned to it later to make hasty corrections, but seems never to have considered its publication.

    This edition is twofold, for there exists an illuminating commentary on the text of the poem by the translator himself, in the written form of a series of lectures given at Oxford in the 1930s; and from these lectures a substantial selection has been made, to form also a commentary on the translation in this book.

    From his creative attention to detail in these lectures there arises a sense of the immediacy and clarity of his vision. It is as if he entered into the imagined past: standing beside Beowulf and his men shaking out their mail-shirts as they beached their ship on the coast of Denmark, listening to the rising anger of Beowulf at the taunting of Unferth, or looking up in amazement at Grendel’s terrible hand set under the roof of Heorot.

    But the commentary in this book includes also much from those lectures in which, while always anchored in the text, he expressed his wider perceptions.

    Sellic Spell, a ‘marvellous tale’, is a story written by Tolkien suggesting what might have been the form and style of an Old English folk-tale of Beowulf, in which there was no association with the ‘historical legends’ of the Northern kingdoms.

    Author: J. R. R. Tolkien, edited by Christopher Tolkien

    Brand: HarperCollins Publishers

    Number of pages: 448

    Binding: Paperback

    Dimensions: 198 x 129 x 29 mm

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